Fast Company

Fast Company

The industrialized West doesn’t know how to deal with death. Culturally, we only seem capable of engaging with the end of a human being’s life in one way: as a problem. That problem can be “solved” by medicalizing it into a million little pieces, throwing money and fantasy at it, or simply turning away from the people facing its natural approach. Rituals of acceptance, dignity, or even beauty around death are not part of our social firmware–which is why a project like Philip Nitschke’s Sarco may seem sincere, obscene, crass, and humane all at once.

Read the full Article on Fastcompany.com

Russia Today

Russia Today

Tired of the old, painful and ugly suicide methods? Now you can have a “peaceful, elective and lawful death” at the press of a button with Sarco, a suicide pod – and it even comes with a built-in eco-friendly coffin.
Alongside halls filled with abstract art and video installations, browsers at the 58th Venice art Biennale can now get a sneak peak at “Sarco” – short for sarcophagus, – a sleek, portable and 3D printable machine that could help bring suicide into the 21st century.
 
Daily Star

Daily Star

As lifespans continue to lengthen, rules around euthanasia are likely to relax. And as they do so, entrepreneurs will be scrambling to offer the most painless and dignified endings.

Australian euthanasia campaigner Philip Nitschke is ahead of the curve with the sleek and elegant Sarco. The Sarco (short for Sarcophagus) is a futuristic Star Trek coffin that, he says, will “allow rational adults the option of a peaceful, elective and lawful death in an elegant and stylish environment”.

A button on the inside of the pod allows the user to flood the enclosure with nitrogen. The effect is, according to Nitschke, a “slightly tipsy” feeling that soon results in a painless death.

Read the full Article on Dailystar.co.uk

Dezeen

Dezeen

Euthanasia advocate Philip Nitschke has created a 3D-printed suicide machine that allows users to administer their own death in a matter of minutes.

Called Sarco, the futuristic-looking machine features a coffin-like sealed pod with transparent panels. It sits on top of a raised platform that leans at an angle.

By pressing a button on the inside of the pod the machine floods with liquid nitrogen, an unregulated substance that can be easily purchased.

This lowers the oxygen level within the capsule, making the user feel “slightly tipsy” before falling unconscious and ultimately, dying.

Read the full Article on Dezeen.com

Tribuna (Mexico)

Tribuna (Mexico)

Sarco es una maquina con forma futurista para los pacientes con enfermedades terminales, con solo un botón se acaba su vida sin dolor.

Recientemente un médico australiano publicó un dispositivo que brinda asistencia a las personas que quieren acabar con su vida de manera sencilla e indolora.

Read the full Article on tribuna.com.mx

Vice

Vice

This weekend, euthanasia campaigner Philip Nitschke will unveil his most ambitious death machine yet, the “Sarco”.

This weekend in Venice, the euthanasia campaigner Philip Nitschke will unveil his most ambitious death machine yet. The 3-D printed “Sarco” (short for sarcophagus) will use nitrogen to provide a quick and peaceful death to any adult of sound mind who wants one. It’s the culmination of a 20-year journey that began when Nitschke invented the “Deliverance” machine – a device that allowed patients to use their laptop to self-administer a lethal injection.

Read the full Article on Vice.com

The Age

The Age

Australian euthanasia campaigner Philip Nitschke is about to unveil his new high-tech death machine in Venice and says people are already lining up to use it.

Dr Nitschke says the Sarco – short for sarcophagus – reinvents the experience of elected deaths.

And given it’s made using 3D printers, it could soon help people legally end their lives in countries that lack euthanasia laws.

Read the full article on theage.com

Independent

Independent

Dr Philip Nitschke – dubbed Dr Death – tells The Independent his device is not intended to glamourise the idea of a person taking their own life.

Opponents of euthanasia have expressed concern at the creation of a “suicide machine”, which has been developed by Dr Philip Nitschke.

The well-known advocate of individuals’ right to die has regularly caused controversy by assisting what he calls “rational suicides”.

Read the full Article on independent.co.uk

The Huffington Post

The Huffington Post

Talk about “dying with dignity” has grown to a calamitous pitch in recent years. “Right to die” groups vie for supremacy, trying to show who can make the dying experience the least degrading. Who can replace the utter macabre-ness of the necessity of death with something more palatable.

In this reclamation of death ― a change from the silence of the past decades, when the subject was even hidden from children ― the focus on dignity is an admirable, yet somewhat clumsy, catch-all for how we should all want to die.

Read the full Article on huffpost.com

The Guardian

The Guardian

Euthanasia advocate displays ‘Sarco’, a pod that fills with nitrogen, which he hopes will one day be available as a 3D-printable device.

A controversial suicide pod that enables its occupant to kill themselves at the press of a button went on display at an Amsterdam funeral show on Saturday.

Read the full Article on theguardian.com

The Washington Post

The Washington Post

It is not the most cheerful offering. But euthanasia activist Philip Nitschke says he is about to revolutionize how we die.

At a funeral fair in Amsterdam last week, he showed off his “suicide machine.” The “Sarco,” short for sarcophagus, is designed to “provide people with a death when they wish to die,” Nitschke, an Australian national, told the news agency Agence France-Presse. It comes with a detachable coffin and a hookup for a nitrogen container.

Read the full article on washingtonpost.com

Vice

Vice

“After a minute and a half, you feel disoriented. In five minutes, you’re gone.”

In the Netherlands, euthanasia was written into the law in 2001. The law went into effect in 2002, which makes the country one of the most progressive when it comes to euthanasia. In 1996, Philip Nitschke became the first doctor to legally administer a deadly injection to one of his patients. In the international debate surrounding the topic of euthanasia, he is one of its most well-known and controversial proponents.

Read the full Article on Vice.com

Newsweek

Newsweek

Dr. Philip Nitschke considers himself the Elon Musk of assisted suicide—and his latest death machine, the Sarco, is his Tesla.

Newsweek spoke with the 70-year-old doctor immediately after the state of Victoria in Australia, his home country, voted this week to legalize euthanasia. Many are billing this as the first law of this nature Down Under, though Nitschke performed his first assisted death in 1996, during a brief period of legality in the country’s Northern Territory.

Read the full Article on Newsweek.com