Sarco at Venice Design 2019

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Philip Nitschke

Philip Nitschke

Philip Nitschke is the founder and director of Exit International.

A former medical doctor, in 1996 Philip helped 4 of his terminally ill patients to die using Australia’s Rights of the Terminally Ill Act.

Philip is the co-author of:

  • Killing Me Softly: Voluntary Euthanasia and the Road to the Peaceful Pill (with Fiona Stewart) (Penguin, 2005)
  • The Peaceful Pill Handbook (with Fiona Stewart) (Exit International, 2006 – 2018)
  • Damned If I Do (with Peter Corris) (Melbourne University Press, 2013)

Philip has designed several end of life machines including the CoGen and the DestinyThe Deliverance Machine (used in the Northern Territory by his patients in 1996) is on permanent display in the British Science Museum in London.

Alexander Bannink

Alexander Bannink

Alexander Bannink Industrial Design is gespecialiseerd in productontwikkeling. Van huishoudelijke apparatuur tot meubels en van mobiele ruimtes tot voertuigconcepten. Met innovatieve ontwerpen realiseert Alexander Bannink dagelijks dromen van zijn opdrachtgevers. Daarnaast inspireert hij bedrijven met nieuwe ideeën over hun producten en adviseert hij over productontwikkeling en ontwerp.

Meer informatie: www.alexanderbannink.com

Portable

Portable

The concept of a capsule that could produce a rapid decrease in oxygen level, while maintaining a low CO2 level, (the conditions for a peaceful, even euphoric death) led to Sarco’s development.

Is it art or … ?

The elegant design was intended to suggest a sense of occasion: of travel to a ‘new destination’, and to dispel the ‘yuk’ factor.

Other design considerations were to devise a system that requires

  • No specialised skills or involvement.
  • No sourcing of difficult to obtain drugs.
  • No need for medical involvement eg. with the insertion of an intravenous cannula.

Those with a significant disability (eg. frailty or increasing paralysis from a disease such as MND/ ALS) would also not be disadvantaged. Activation by eye movement or voice control is anticipated.

The Sarco was inspired by UK man, Tony Nicklinson.

Suicide Machine that could be Controlled by the Blink of an Eye Sparks Euthanasia Debate‘ – The Independent, 17 April 2018.

The goal of Sarco is to remove the need for any assistance. This ensures any use of the Sarco is legal.

Coffin incorpoated

Coffin incorpoated

Sarco will be printed from a biodegradable wood amalgam and its upper part can be detached and used as a coffin.

3D Printed

3D Printed

Sarco is 3D printed and its plans will be available online.

Most office stores now offer small-scale 3D printing. There are also many cheap models you can buy for home use. However, this is a fast-changing field and it is easy to envisage that 3D print shops which print large-scale (required for Sarco) are not far off. When the technology becomes available, these stores will be everywhere and the cost will drop significantly.

What if we dared to imagine that our last day might also be one of our most exciting?

What if we had more than mere dignity to look forward to on our last day on this planet?

Russia Today

Russia Today

Tired of the old, painful and ugly suicide methods? Now you can have a “peaceful, elective and lawful death” at the press of a button with Sarco, a suicide pod – and it even comes with a built-in eco-friendly coffin.
Alongside halls filled with abstract art and video installations, browsers at the 58th Venice art Biennale can now get a sneak peak at “Sarco” – short for sarcophagus, – a sleek, portable and 3D printable machine that could help bring suicide into the 21st century.
 
Daily Star

Daily Star

As lifespans continue to lengthen, rules around euthanasia are likely to relax. And as they do so, entrepreneurs will be scrambling to offer the most painless and dignified endings.

Australian euthanasia campaigner Philip Nitschke is ahead of the curve with the sleek and elegant Sarco. The Sarco (short for Sarcophagus) is a futuristic Star Trek coffin that, he says, will “allow rational adults the option of a peaceful, elective and lawful death in an elegant and stylish environment”.

A button on the inside of the pod allows the user to flood the enclosure with nitrogen. The effect is, according to Nitschke, a “slightly tipsy” feeling that soon results in a painless death.

Read the full Article on Dailystar.co.uk

Dezeen

Dezeen

Euthanasia advocate Philip Nitschke has created a 3D-printed suicide machine that allows users to administer their own death in a matter of minutes.

Called Sarco, the futuristic-looking machine features a coffin-like sealed pod with transparent panels. It sits on top of a raised platform that leans at an angle.

By pressing a button on the inside of the pod the machine floods with liquid nitrogen, an unregulated substance that can be easily purchased.

This lowers the oxygen level within the capsule, making the user feel “slightly tipsy” before falling unconscious and ultimately, dying.

Read the full Article on Dezeen.com

Tribuna (Mexico)

Tribuna (Mexico)

Sarco es una maquina con forma futurista para los pacientes con enfermedades terminales, con solo un botón se acaba su vida sin dolor.

Recientemente un médico australiano publicó un dispositivo que brinda asistencia a las personas que quieren acabar con su vida de manera sencilla e indolora.

Read the full Article on tribuna.com.mx

Vice

Vice

This weekend, euthanasia campaigner Philip Nitschke will unveil his most ambitious death machine yet, the “Sarco”.

This weekend in Venice, the euthanasia campaigner Philip Nitschke will unveil his most ambitious death machine yet. The 3-D printed “Sarco” (short for sarcophagus) will use nitrogen to provide a quick and peaceful death to any adult of sound mind who wants one. It’s the culmination of a 20-year journey that began when Nitschke invented the “Deliverance” machine – a device that allowed patients to use their laptop to self-administer a lethal injection.

Read the full Article on Vice.com

The Age

The Age

Australian euthanasia campaigner Philip Nitschke is about to unveil his new high-tech death machine in Venice and says people are already lining up to use it.

Dr Nitschke says the Sarco – short for sarcophagus – reinvents the experience of elected deaths.

And given it’s made using 3D printers, it could soon help people legally end their lives in countries that lack euthanasia laws.

Read the full article on theage.com

Independent

Independent

Dr Philip Nitschke – dubbed Dr Death – tells The Independent his device is not intended to glamourise the idea of a person taking their own life.

Opponents of euthanasia have expressed concern at the creation of a “suicide machine”, which has been developed by Dr Philip Nitschke.

The well-known advocate of individuals’ right to die has regularly caused controversy by assisting what he calls “rational suicides”.

Read the full Article on independent.co.uk

The Huffington Post

The Huffington Post

Talk about “dying with dignity” has grown to a calamitous pitch in recent years. “Right to die” groups vie for supremacy, trying to show who can make the dying experience the least degrading. Who can replace the utter macabre-ness of the necessity of death with something more palatable.

In this reclamation of death ― a change from the silence of the past decades, when the subject was even hidden from children ― the focus on dignity is an admirable, yet somewhat clumsy, catch-all for how we should all want to die.

Read the full Article on huffpost.com

The Guardian

The Guardian

Euthanasia advocate displays ‘Sarco’, a pod that fills with nitrogen, which he hopes will one day be available as a 3D-printable device.

A controversial suicide pod that enables its occupant to kill themselves at the press of a button went on display at an Amsterdam funeral show on Saturday.

Read the full Article on theguardian.com

The Washington Post

The Washington Post

It is not the most cheerful offering. But euthanasia activist Philip Nitschke says he is about to revolutionize how we die.

At a funeral fair in Amsterdam last week, he showed off his “suicide machine.” The “Sarco,” short for sarcophagus, is designed to “provide people with a death when they wish to die,” Nitschke, an Australian national, told the news agency Agence France-Presse. It comes with a detachable coffin and a hookup for a nitrogen container.

Read the full article on washingtonpost.com

Vice

Vice

“After a minute and a half, you feel disoriented. In five minutes, you’re gone.”

In the Netherlands, euthanasia was written into the law in 2001. The law went into effect in 2002, which makes the country one of the most progressive when it comes to euthanasia. In 1996, Philip Nitschke became the first doctor to legally administer a deadly injection to one of his patients. In the international debate surrounding the topic of euthanasia, he is one of its most well-known and controversial proponents.

Read the full Article on Vice.com

Newsweek

Newsweek

Dr. Philip Nitschke considers himself the Elon Musk of assisted suicide—and his latest death machine, the Sarco, is his Tesla.

Newsweek spoke with the 70-year-old doctor immediately after the state of Victoria in Australia, his home country, voted this week to legalize euthanasia. Many are billing this as the first law of this nature Down Under, though Nitschke performed his first assisted death in 1996, during a brief period of legality in the country’s Northern Territory.

Read the full Article on Newsweek.com